Moonlit 1, 2, and 3 by Jae Schalekamp

Moonlit 1. Acrylic on Canvas. 12 H x 12 W x 1.5 in

Moonlit 2. Acrylic on Canvas. 12 H x 12 W x 1.5 in.

Moonlit 3. Acrylic on Canvas. 12 H x 12 W x 1.5 in.

In this series of three paintings by artist Jae Schalekamp, moonlit scenes of a city street have been painted, perhaps out of the artist’s own window. A fog-like grey pervades the paintings so that nothing is seen with clear definition, though one sees that there are buildings with lit windows across an empty street. In two of the paintings, a tree branch or trunk painted in black is in the foreground, not only emphasizing that it is night time, but also giving these a dynamism that is perhaps missing from the third painting in the series.

Krukov Canal by Igor Nelubovich

Krukov Canal. Acrylic on Canvas. 70.9 H x 70.9 W x 1.6 in

In this pleasingly complex landscape painting by Russian artist Igor Nelubovich, the famous Krukov Canal of St. Petersburg is painted in winter; trees, lamp-posts, and fences are presented as harsh angular black shadows, and the snow is far from pristine. The only prominent regions of color are two, probably richly ornate, buildings of some sort. Their distant magnificence is in opposition to the inhospitable aspect of what is immediately observed before us.


Igor Nelubovich

The Scent of Rain and Wet Hair by Robert Bubel

The Scent of Rain and Wet Hair. Oil on Canvas. 37.4 H x 33.5 W x 0.8 in

Few paintings of rain feel quite as wet as this evocative painting by artist Robert Bubel. Here, two trees painted in black and blue drip with rain over a sidewalk running along an empty street. Painted in whites and yellows, details of the street and sidewalk are lost, as they are slick and glossy with an abundance of rain.

Titled, The Scent of Rain and Wet Hair, the piece attains its forceful presence, in part, by drawing upon our own memories of walking in the rain. The title also does something interesting: although no figure is visible, some person must be present: the person whose wet hair is smelled, and the one who smells that hair. These, of course, could be the one and same, and the artist himself.


Robert Bubel

Available for a Limited Time by Sam Tudyk

Available for a Limited Time. Acrylic on Paper and Wood. 24 H x 20 W x 0.9 in

In Available for a limited Time by American artist Sam Tudyk a large, unused, billboard looms over two small houses on a green forested hill. Power lines pass behind it, hanging like old cobwebs, reinforcing the impression that, despite the signage’s self-reported availability, the billboard is derelict, once available, but as it turns out, only for a limited time.

Intermission. Mixed media on wood. 16 H x 20 W x 0.9 in

In Intermission an abandoned drive-in theater screen sits in an empty parking lot at night. Drive-in speakers on posts stand in neat rows, wires twisting like weeds. The dilapidated screen is riddled with holes, exposing the ribs of its backing frame. If it is intermission, no one has waited around to see the next act. But who knows? What is old can become new again.


Sam Tudyk

Part of the Crowd by Edith Torony

Acrylic, Oil, Spray Paint on Canvas. 47.2 x 39.4 x 0.8 in

Romanian artist Edith Torony creates richly textured abstracts composed of what are only nearly recognizable components. In Part of the Crowd, small figures are scattered within a dirty, crowded circle, one half of which is in darkness, and the other bathed in a dirty ochre. Given the title of the piece, the elements within it, and the utter lack of green or blue, one is tempted to see here a grim depiction of the our planet, either in its current or future ecological state. Regardless of the interpretation, the painting elicits a feeling of discord and claustrophobia.

Two Mountains by Paul Patrick Morrison

In these two landscape paintings by Australian painter Paul Patrick Morrison, mountains appear as anything but tranquil. Instead, using vibrant color, sharp contrasts, and almost violent compositions, these mountains feel both beautiful and dangerous, dynamic entities that must be reckoned with.

And indeed they are. Mountain 1, is in fact, K2, the second tallest mountain in the world.

Mountain 1. Oil on Wood. 11.9 x 11.9 x 0.4 in

Mountain 2. Oil on Wood. 11.9 x 11.7 x 0.6 in