Beach Day by Emma Copley

Beach Day. Oil on Wood. 19.5 H x 31.5 W x 1.5 in

In Beach Day by British artist Emma Copley, a multitude of people occupy a distant sandy ocean-side beach. A bluff is seen in the distance, upon which are several cheerful white houses with blue windows. In the foreground is a small rambling fence. The sea is painted in a myriad of blues, pinks and yellows, while the beach sand is predominately yellow and orange. The scene is lively and fun, but distant. This distance, coupled with the thickly applied paint and vibrant color, encourages us to focus on larger patterns of how people group together and use space, rather than their individual activities. A socially oriented landscape.


Emma Copley

The Scent of Rain and Wet Hair by Robert Bubel

The Scent of Rain and Wet Hair. Oil on Canvas. 37.4 H x 33.5 W x 0.8 in

Few paintings of rain feel quite as wet as this evocative painting by artist Robert Bubel. Here, two trees painted in black and blue drip with rain over a sidewalk running along an empty street. Painted in whites and yellows, details of the street and sidewalk are lost, as they are slick and glossy with an abundance of rain.

Titled, The Scent of Rain and Wet Hair, the piece attains its forceful presence, in part, by drawing upon our own memories of walking in the rain. The title also does something interesting: although no figure is visible, some person must be present: the person whose wet hair is smelled, and the one who smells that hair. These, of course, could be the one and same, and the artist himself.


Robert Bubel

Watching Swallows by Owen Normand

Watching Swallows. Oil on Wood. 9.7 H x 15.7 W x 0.1 in

In Watching Swallows by German artist Owen Normand, a girl in a bright orange shirt pulled over a light blue dress, dangles her feet in the water of a swimming pool on a sunny day, apparently absorbed in watching the sun’s light reflected and refracted in the pool’s water, like little swallows dancing in the air. Her sandals lay beside her.

The painting is one of a series entitled Slivers and Inklings, which the painter describes as “based around the idea of searching the sense of mystery that we lose as we grow older and, sometimes more cynical.”

Breakup by Monika Marchewka

Breakup I. Oil on Canvas. 39.4 H x 39.4 W x 0.8 in

Breakup II. Oil on Canvas. 39.4 H x 39.4 W x 1.2 in

In her series of paintings titled Breakup, Polish artist Monika Marchewkapoignantly portrays the interior experience of grief as revealed in the act of covering oneself in a blanket; it is however the blanket itself, more than the act, that conveys the emotion in these paintings. Painted in cold whites and blues, but more tumultuously textured than the room’s interior, the blanket appears like a snow drift that has buried the grieving woman beneath it.

Two Mountains by Paul Patrick Morrison

In these two landscape paintings by Australian painter Paul Patrick Morrison, mountains appear as anything but tranquil. Instead, using vibrant color, sharp contrasts, and almost violent compositions, these mountains feel both beautiful and dangerous, dynamic entities that must be reckoned with.

And indeed they are. Mountain 1, is in fact, K2, the second tallest mountain in the world.

Mountain 1. Oil on Wood. 11.9 x 11.9 x 0.4 in

Mountain 2. Oil on Wood. 11.9 x 11.7 x 0.6 in

Lets Meet in Real, Painting by Robert Bubel

In this pleasing oil painting by Polish artist Robert Bubel, a woman walks through an open art gallery towards a group of paintings hanging on the wall. Paint drips from the canvases, as if to express their fresh vibrancy. The title of the piece is provocative; is it addressed to the woman in the painting? or is it an invitation to view the art in its natural format: hanging on a wall, rather than as a digital image.

Oil on Canvas. 35.4 H x 39.4 W x 0.8 in