An Untitled Figurative Painting by Majid Eskandari

Untitled. Acrylic on Canvas. 36 H x 30 W x 0.8 in

A woman wearing a bright red shirt, sits, her legs tucked and crossed beneath her in this figurative abstract painting by Iranian Canadian painter Majid Eskandari. The details of the woman’s face has been replaced by non-representational overlapping strokes of vibrant color. The intense red color of her shirt, and the tone of her flesh is set against a sedate and more uniformly painted background: a light blue wall, and grey floor.

By obscuring the woman’s face, the artist frustrates our natural tendency to read the face to inform our interpretation of the mood of a figurative painting (a technique that seems quite popular among a number of contemporary artists, Hanna Ilczyszyn to take just one example). Instead, we rely on the cheerful colors, and the apparent youth and beauty of the figure’s form.


Majid Eskandari

Moonlit 1, 2, and 3 by Jae Schalekamp

Moonlit 1. Acrylic on Canvas. 12 H x 12 W x 1.5 in

Moonlit 2. Acrylic on Canvas. 12 H x 12 W x 1.5 in.

Moonlit 3. Acrylic on Canvas. 12 H x 12 W x 1.5 in.

In this series of three paintings by artist Jae Schalekamp, moonlit scenes of a city street have been painted, perhaps out of the artist’s own window. A fog-like grey pervades the paintings so that nothing is seen with clear definition, though one sees that there are buildings with lit windows across an empty street. In two of the paintings, a tree branch or trunk painted in black is in the foreground, not only emphasizing that it is night time, but also giving these a dynamism that is perhaps missing from the third painting in the series.

Pinguin by Margit Platny

Pinguin. Oil on Canvas. 66.9 H x 47.2 W x 0.7 in

In this painting by Austrian artist Margit Platny, now living and working in Italy, a group of three figures painted in various shades of gray, are seen walking determinedly toward their own colorfully patterned shadows, which extend outward from their feet as might be observed in the last moments of daylight. The ground, painted in places green and others gray, is fog-like, as if the ground were a sheet of glass, or perhaps a mirror, upon which moisture had gathered such that it is only in their shadows that we can see more truly the nature of the world they walk upon.

The Harvest by Qais Al-Sindy

Harvest Season. Oil on Canvas. 60 H x 40 W x 1 in

In Harvest Season by Iraqi-American painter Qais Al-Sindy a man and a woman present their harvest of dates. The man, clothed in white, stands behind the woman, clothed in red and black and holding a bowl, as if to invite the observer to taste the fruit of their labor. Their colorful garb contrasts with the more sedate colors in the background. In describing the painting, the artist recalls visiting Southern Iraq and watching palm date farmers climbing trees to harvest the dates. The painting, indeed, presents itself as an amalgamation of memories recalled with the vibrancy of youth.